PLEDGE to VOTE YES for ASHEVILLE BONDS

nancy_childrenThe places where we live shape our lives and our health. Safe, accessible and connected neighborhoods lay a foundation for a more equitable and thriving city where families can live, work and play. Investing in housing affordability and infrastructure like sidewalks, bus shelters, greenways, parks and streets can improve our health and support our families’ success.

Our communities and neighborhoods affect our health in important ways. When we live in homes that are near parks and bike paths, exercise is easier. When we live near grocery stores where good food is available, it’s easier to eat healthy. If our homes, have lead, mold, and other toxins we can become sick. And when housing is really expensive, it makes it hard to afford food, and health care. This can increase our stress and harms our children’s health.

Asheville’s expensive and tight housing market creates a situation where many of our teachers, nurses, social workers, and hospitality, retail, and restaurant workers can’t afford to live in the same city as they work. This can lead to increased stress as families confront financial insecurity and even homelessness. But access to a safe, affordable place to call home is not enough. Homes need to be in neighborhoods that are connected by sidewalks, city bus routes and greenways so we have access to grocery stores, libraries, and public services. Connected neighborhoods remove isolation and promote healthy living.

The good news is that we can overcome these barriers and create equitable opportunities for all of our city’s residents by voting YES to the City of Asheville’s bond referenda in the upcoming election in November. These three referenda will provide funding to build new homes and apartments all around the city that families can afford as well as the infrastructure to connect neighborhoods to schools, work, grocery stores, and parks.

One community that will benefit from sidewalks funded by the bond is along the Johnston Boulevard corridor in the 28806 zip-code of West Asheville. The children in this community attend Johnston Elementary School.  Within a mile of this neighborhood are a grocery store, a public library, and a park. But Johnston Boulevard is a narrow and winding road without sidewalks. Families don’t have safe walking routes to Johnston Elementary, bus stops, the library, parks or the grocery store. This literally leaves our children behind.

PLEDGE taby_3lineo VOTE YES for Asheville Bonds by clicking here. Together we can create a city that works for all its residents and we are all proud to call home.

 

For more information about the Asheville Bond, and the projects the funding will support, please go to www.AVLBondsYes.com

The places where we live shape our lives and our health. Safe, accessible and connected neighborhoods lay a foundation for a more equitable and thriving city where families can live, work and play. Investing in housing affordability and infrastructure like sidewalks, bus shelters, greenways, parks and streets can improve our health and support our families’ success.

 

Our communities and neighborhoods affect our health in important ways. When we live in homes that are near parks and bike paths, exercise is easier. When we live near grocery stores where good food is available, it’s easier to eat healthy. If our homes, have lead, mold, and other toxins we can become sick. And when housing is really expensive, it makes it hard to afford food, and health care. This can increase our stress and harms our children’s health.

 

Asheville’s expensive and tight housing market creates a situation where many of our teachers, nurses, social workers, and hospitality, retail, and restaurant workers can’t afford to live in the same city as they work. This can lead to increased stress as families confront financial insecurity and even homelessness. But access to a safe, affordable place to call home is not enough. Homes need to be in neighborhoods that are connected by sidewalks, city bus routes and greenways so we have access to grocery stores, libraries, and public services. Connected neighborhoods remove isolation and promote healthy living.

 

The good news is that we can overcome these barriers and create equitable opportunities for all of our city’s residents by voting YES to the City of Asheville’s bond referenda in the upcoming election in November. These three referenda will provide funding to build new homes and apartments all around the city that families can afford as well as the infrastructure to connect neighborhoods to schools, work, grocery stores, and parks.

 

One community that will benefit from sidewalks funded by the bond is along the Johnston Boulevard corridor in the 28806 zip-code of West Asheville. The children in this community attend Johnston Elementary School.  Within a mile of this neighborhood are a grocery store, a public library, and a park. But Johnston Boulevard is a narrow and winding road without sidewalks. Families don’t have safe walking routes to Johnston Elementary, bus stops, the library, parks or the grocery store. This literally leaves our children behind.

 

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